The soul of a wistful Irishman imprisoned in the avatar of a straight-laced trooper whose duty it is to enforce the British laws regardless of sentiment. A diligent and rigidly disciplined exterior would be imperative armour for the protection of such an empathic and humane inner world. The dichotomy in Michael Adair’s psyche must have been torture! The fact that he spent the night respectfully conversing with the man he would eventually have to kill is testament to a benevolence and courage I doubt I would be able to muster. I am certain I would be seated with the gruff and seemingly uncaring men around the fire, trying to distance ourselves from the humanity of Daniel Carney and the abhorrent task we must perform in the morning.

Reading this book I was continually reminded of the beginning scenes from the film “The Crying Game”. This 1992 movie became famous for a very clever plot twist, but for me it always raised so many other questions. The relationship between Fergus and Dil brings up the eternal question of what love actually is. However it was the relationship between Fergus  and Jody  in the beginning of the story that kept creeping up while I read “Conversations at Curlow Creek”. Fergus was an IRA member and Jodi was a kidnapped British soldier in Fergus’s custody. It is easy to hate someone from a distance.; to imagine the ‘enemy’ as an evil person who is void of emotions and decency. How can you maintain that contempt if you actually talk to the person and begin to understand their humanness and the path that lead them to be on the ‘side’ that they are on? Life is very rarely cut neatly into ‘good guys’ and ‘bad guys’.

697_CryingGameThe_Catalog_Poster

6 thoughts on “Blog 7: The Conflict Between Outer and Inner World

  1. Nigel,
    Wow! What a read! As usual, your blogs are thorough and uniquely captivating. I’m particularly fond of the first image you used. Not only did it draw me in immediately, but I found it quite perfectly reflected the inner turmoil present in the character of Adair as discussed in your blog. Just remember that all material, including images, need to be referenced.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow, Nigel, I wish I had kept up to date with your blogs previous to this week! I thoroughly enjoyed this entry as your concisely express both a critical and creative aspect of the novel. Your ideas a rich and relevant and written with such a creative twist of language. I especially loved your opinion when you say.

    “The dichotomy in Michael Adair’s psyche must have been torture! The fact that he spent the night respectfully conversing with the man he would eventually have to kill is testament to a benevolence and courage I doubt I would be able to muster. I am certain I would be seated with the gruff and seemingly uncaring men around the fire, trying to distance ourselves from the humanity of Daniel Carney and the abhorrent task we must perform in the morning.”

    You have a wonderful ability to engage readers and develop strong ideas. Linking to another text is also highly relevant and beneficial in allowing others to understand the ideas through linking to another text.

    My only critique is to do a final check over your work, as I found an error, “…eventually have to kill is testament to a benevolence and courage I…” Did you mean ‘a’ testament”?

    Overall, I loved your blog! Good luck with the end of semester 🙂
    Sarah

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hey Nigel,

    The expression in your writing is so clear and enjoyable to read. The ideas you put forward are strong, especially considering you place them on the backdrop of what you would do if you were placed in a situation similar to the one Michael Adair found himself in.

    I can’t say I’ve watched the Crying Game but it’s a movie that seems worth watching. I think you drawing parallels between the novel and movie supported your understanding of the text as a whole.

    Thanks for the entry,

    Daniel

    Liked by 1 person

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